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asked on 08 Dec '18 at 19:10

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Puppy love answer on 09 May '11 at 20:08

there are lots of side effects for giving birth that early, my son was born at 30 weeks and was in the NICU for almost three months we weren't sure if he was going to make it or not, its scary to have your baby early typically they will let you go into labor around 36 or 37 weeks though, although its best to wait (if you can) until 40 weeks. its not usually someones fault if they deliver early mine was due to an incompetent cervix, many other factors can cause early labor, you can look it up or talk to your doctor about it.

~ ☼ zaiden's mommy ☼ ~ answer on 10 May '11 at 01:43

I was only a "fingertip" dilated until I went to the hospital and was induced. I went for my regular check-up 2 days before my due date and told my OB I was SO tired of being pregnant and that it was a good weekend for me to have my son because my husband was off work for several days straight so I went in that night (at about 1/2 cm dilated) and they gave me a pill - I can't remember what it was called - that got me contracting. I had regular contractions until about 3 AM but didn't dilate. They started my pitocin then and I really contracted hard but still didn't dilate. About 8 AM I was in so much pain but only about 2 1/2 cm so my OB came in and told them to get my epidural going and right afterward he came back in and broke my water. I went from 2 1/2 to 3 cm at about 9 AM to 10 cm at 12 PM, started pushing at 12:05PM and my son was born at 12:48PM! However, the nurse at my OB's office walked around at 3 cm for 2 weeks so, like you said, everyone is totally different! And just because you might dilate early this pregnancy, your next may be like mine. Either way, GOOD LUCK and CONGRATS!!!!!!

Real life has no soundtrack answer on 10 May '11 at 11:42

With my first, my son was born 3 weeks early. With my second, I went 2 days over my due date and then begged for an induction. Every pregnancy is different, unless there is a problem with you physically that caused your first to be born early, for example if you have an incompetent cervix. There is always a chance for miscarriage, but again, unless you have some physical problem that makes you prone to miscarriage, the chance for miscarrying isn't any greater this time than any other time. It's normal to freak out and stress! Just remember every pregnancy is different, and take good care of yourself. That's all you can do.

Sevenofus answer on 10 May '11 at 13:54

An average pregnancy is considered to be 40 weeks counted from the first day of the last menstrual period. It is more common to count from the first day of the last menstrual period because date of conception is not easily determined. Even using an ovulation predictor kit or monitoring basal body temperature and cervical mucous, you can't know for sure when ovulation occurred. At best you will come up with a likely time frame to ovulate. In addition to the unknown factor of when the egg is released from the ovary, you also have the variable of how long sperm live inside a woman. Sperm do have potential to live inside a woman for several days, possibly as long as 6-7 days if conditions are optimal. After the egg has released from the ovary it remains viable for 12-24 hours, possibly as long as 48 hours. You can not, with all certainity, say that conception takes place the day you have love because of these factors. If you somehow know when conception took place, such as in the cases of fertility treatment procedures that fertilize the egg in a laboratory setting, than the average gestational period is considered to be 266 days or 38 weeks. When the fertilized egg implants in the uterus has no bearing on the length of the pregnancy. Even using 38 or 40 weeks is only an average. A good example to explain this is with the case of my cousin and his wife. They tried for 10 years to have a baby. When they had saved enough money they went through fertility treatments and discovered my cousin's sperm were damaged. They harvested her eggs and used donor sperm. They knew the exact moment of conception simply because it happened right there in the lab in front of the technicians. It took several tries, but finally one of the fertilized eggs implanted. They gave them a due date 266 days after the egg had been fertilized in the lab. In theory you would think that baby would have been born exactly on the due date. She wasn't. Their beautiful baby girl was born 9 days before it. Everything is based on averages. There is no exact science when it comes to predicting exactly when a baby might arrive. In regards to implantation, it varies considerably, but on average, the length of time it takes for the fertilized egg to implant in the uterus is 7-10 days. This, again, is nearly impossible to determine when it actually occurs.

Sevenofus answer on 11 May '11 at 00:20

An average pregnancy is considered to be 40 weeks counted from the first day of the last menstrual period. It is more common to count from the first day of the last menstrual period because date of conception is not easily determined. Even using an ovulation predictor kit or monitoring basal body temperature and cervical mucous, you can't know for sure when ovulation occurred. At best you will come up with a likely time frame to ovulate. In addition to the unknown factor of when the egg is released from the ovary, you also have the variable of how long sperm live inside a woman. Sperm do have potential to live inside a woman for several days, possibly as long as 6-7 days if conditions are optimal. After the egg has released from the ovary it remains viable for 12-24 hours, possibly as long as 48 hours. You can not, with all certainity, say that conception takes place the day you have love because of these factors. If you somehow know when conception took place, such as in the cases of fertility treatment procedures that fertilize the egg in a laboratory setting, than the average gestational period is considered to be 266 days or 38 weeks. When the fertilized egg implants in the uterus has no bearing on the length of the pregnancy. Even using 38 or 40 weeks is only an average. A good example to explain this is with the case of my cousin and his wife. They tried for 10 years to have a baby. When they had saved enough money they went through fertility treatments and discovered my cousin's sperm were damaged. They harvested her eggs and used donor sperm. They knew the exact moment of conception simply because it happened right there in the lab in front of the technicians. It took several tries, but finally one of the fertilized eggs implanted. They gave them a due date 266 days after the egg had been fertilized in the lab. In theory you would think that baby would have been born exactly on the due date. She wasn't. Their beautiful baby girl was born 9 days before it. Everything is based on averages. There is no exact science when it comes to predicting exactly when a baby might arrive. In regards to implantation, it varies considerably, but on average, the length of time it takes for the fertilized egg to implant in the uterus is 7-10 days. This, again, is nearly impossible to determine when it actually occurs.