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what are the chances of being pregnant on ovulation ..?

what are the chances of being pregnant on ovulation day and one day after?

Wee asked on 28 Feb '18 at 09:44

Post Answer - Aapka Jawab

Answers of Similar Question


Melly answer on 09 May '11 at 17:44

It depends on how early the fertilized egg begins the implantation process once it reaches the uterus, because that's when HCG levels begin to increase. Implantation, on average, begins somewhere 7-10 days after fertilization although it happens slightly earlier or later in some cases. I'd say that 7 days after actual fertilization is on the outside of what might be detectable by a home pregnancy test and chances are very, very slim that early. As in you'd be better off waiting until at least 10 days after ovulation to even think about testing and you're still very likely to get a possibly false negative. Even a blood test, which is very sensitive, generally won't detect a pregnancy until at least 10 days after ovulation and fertilization.

Icare answer on 09 May '11 at 22:02

This is tricky because usually a pregnancy test will give a positive reading just about 11 days after fertilisation of the ovum, but in your case, if you never get periods, you need to get checked out to see if you are actually ovulating at all. Birth control pills don't give you real periods ( i.e. based on a normal hormonal cycle of ovulation, and then shedding of a non-pregnant uterine lining). With birth control pills your body is conned into thinking it is pregnant so that you don't get pregnant! You then get a 'bleed' when you stop taking it. Natural hormones of all kinds are the 'messengers' used by your body to control all kinds of functions. The love hormones are the messengers that tell your ovaries and your uterus when to do what they are supposed to do. Birth control pills are artificial messengers which cause artificial symptoms. Women are sometimes prescribed birth control pills to reduce their menstrual flow if their periods are particularly troublesome, heavy and painful. If your own hormones are out of balance to the degree that you don't get periods at all, I think it is highly unlikely that you would be ovulating, and therefore the chances that you could become pregnant are virtually nil. Even girls with irregular periods sometimes have difficulty getting pregnant. Having said that, it only takes one egg and one sperm to make a baby! Please go back to whoever prescribes your birth control pills and tell them what is happening with your body. I'm surprised that you were prescribed birth control pills when you don't have periods. Don't leave these things to chance. It may be that you need altogether different treatment and that these pills are causing you symptoms you shouldn't be having. It sounds like your body is confused and needs some help. Artificial hormones are very powerful - they can make men grow breasts and women grow beards!

Jay-jay answer on 09 May '11 at 22:30

There isn’t more of a chance for pregnancy around ovulation, as it is the only chance to get pregnant when ovulating – think about it, how can you get pregnant without an egg? The idea you can get pregnant any time is a half-truth scare tactic taught in schools, as many people aren't responsible enough to educate themselves they continue to believe this and don't understand menstrual cycles or conception. You ovulate one day per cycle around two weeks before your period, the egg lives a few days but about a week before ovulation you produce fertile cervical mucus that protects sperm allowing it to live for up to seven days. So a couple are fertile for around a week, birth control methods like fertility awareness give a few extra days as buffer so all together there are 8-10 days classed as fertile days. You only actually get pregnant when you ovulate, you are fertile for a few days beforehand, the rest of the time you can’t get pregnant, it’s biologically impossible.

Icare answer on 10 May '11 at 14:23

This is tricky because usually a pregnancy test will give a positive reading just about 11 days after fertilisation of the ovum, but in your case, if you never get periods, you need to get checked out to see if you are actually ovulating at all. Birth control pills don't give you real periods ( i.e. based on a normal hormonal cycle of ovulation, and then shedding of a non-pregnant uterine lining). With birth control pills your body is conned into thinking it is pregnant so that you don't get pregnant! You then get a 'bleed' when you stop taking it. Natural hormones of all kinds are the 'messengers' used by your body to control all kinds of functions. The love hormones are the messengers that tell your ovaries and your uterus when to do what they are supposed to do. Birth control pills are artificial messengers which cause artificial symptoms. Women are sometimes prescribed birth control pills to reduce their menstrual flow if their periods are particularly troublesome, heavy and painful. If your own hormones are out of balance to the degree that you don't get periods at all, I think it is highly unlikely that you would be ovulating, and therefore the chances that you could become pregnant are virtually nil. Even girls with irregular periods sometimes have difficulty getting pregnant. Having said that, it only takes one egg and one sperm to make a baby! Please go back to whoever prescribes your birth control pills and tell them what is happening with your body. I'm surprised that you were prescribed birth control pills when you don't have periods. Don't leave these things to chance. It may be that you need altogether different treatment and that these pills are causing you symptoms you shouldn't be having. It sounds like your body is confused and needs some help. Artificial hormones are very powerful - they can make men grow breasts and women grow beards!

Krish answer on 30 Jun '11 at 16:17

Fertilization is a process of meeting (after mating) of the sperm with a mature egg. It begins with sperm egg collision and ends with a formation of life called zygote (single mononucleotide cell mass). The ovum immediately following ovulation is picked up by the fibril end of the fallopian tube and is rapidly transported to the ampullary part of the tube. The fertile period is period around ovulation, during which if relations are kept, the chances of pregnancy are high. In order to improve the chances of pregnancy, it is important to understand how to calculate the fertile period.