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How long after an ectopic pregnancy is treated with methotrexate can you start trying to concieve again?

My last pregnancy was an ectopic and it was treated with methotrexate by one injection and was told not to try to concieve till after 6 monthes. But have heard others trying right away, like within a month. We are anxious to try again but, scared that if we start trying again of running the risk of another loss, or even birth defects. Any advice?

Kso asked on 09 May '11 at 21:49

Post Answer - Aapka Jawab

1 Answers


~^~miss cassie~^~ answer on 09 May '11 at 21:49

Hey, The doctor tells you to wait 6mths for a reason... I had an ectopic pregnancy last week and was too injected with the Methotrexate...My doctor told me to wait 6mths! Goodluck and sorry to hear of your loss! Take Care Cassie xxx

Answers of Similar Question


Rhianna does medicine year 1 answer on 09 May '11 at 17:44

Yes and no. The hormones that are increased in pregnancy and contained in the contraceptive Pill aren't the only risk factors for blot clots forming during pregnancy. What the Pill and pregnancy both have in common is that they both produce hormones that increase the bloods clotting ability. Oestrogen increases the risk of DVTs by increasing the production of certain chemicals necessary for the blood to clot. It also increases platelet numbers + stickiness of platelets, which increases clot formation (to prepare for blood loss during child birth). Progestogen in the Pill causes the blood vessels to relax and widen, allowing the blood to pool in the veins, increasing risk of clot formation. Blood clots in pregnancy are generally the result of increased venous stasis- blood pooling in the lower deep veins. As I said above, balance of proteins of the coagulation + fibrinolytic systems also play a part. DVT can of course lead to a pulmonary embolism. Clots in pregnancy and from the Pill are generally always the results of clots that have formed in the deep veins of the legs, broken away and then embolised in the lungs. Women who do have clots in pregnancy and whilst taking the contraceptive Pill, generally also have certain other risk factors such as protein C and S deficiency and most commonly Factor V Leiden mutation. Over all health of the woman also plays a part- obesity, poor diet/unhealthy lifestyle and a smoking history also increases the risk as does age. During pregnancy the uterus also expands, putting pressure on the lower blood vessels which can restrict blood flow from the legs and pelvis back to the heart. Physiological structural changes during pregnancy are risk factors alone.

Tweetybird answer on 10 May '11 at 11:01

It's recommended that a woman wait after receiving an MMR to become pregnant. Some clinicians advise 4 weeks while others advise waiting for as long as 3 months. As far as the vaccine, for measles the standard recommendation for women is to postpone conception for 3 months after vaccination due to a theoretical risk of fetal infection following maternal vaccination. There are no reports to substantiate this potential risk. Actual infection with measles is at most associated with an increased risk of prematurity or spontaneous abortion, but not birth defects. For mumps, the recommendation is that women wait three months before conceiving following vaccination is based on a theoretical risk of placental infection, not actual reports of placental infection. Mumps vaccination is not likely to be associated with an increased risk for birth defects since mumps infection itself is not likely to increase the risk for fetal malformations. The most serious risk associated with mumps infection is the risk of spontaneous abortion following mumps infection. For rubella, concerns have been raised about the possibility of an infant developing congenital rubella syndrome subsequent to maternal vaccination. Data to date suggests that the risk of having an infant with birth defects following immunization during pregnancy or three months prior to conception is minimal. The theoretical risk is thought to be about 1.7%, although no cases of congenital rubella syndrome following immunization three months pre or post conception have been observed. So for this reason, immunization during pregnancy or within three months prior to conception is contraindicated. However, if immunization should occur, the risk of birth defects is thought not to warrant the interruption of the pregnancy. For chicken pox (varicella), if a pregnant woman is vaccinated or becomes pregnant within 1 month of vaccination, she should be counseled about potential effects on the fetus. Wild-type varicella poses a small risk to the fetus, and because the virulence of the attenuated virus used in the vaccine is less than that of the wild-type virus, the risk to the fetus should be lower or absent. I think the baby will be fine but she should continue to be monitored by her OB/Gyn for possible problems as well as routine monitoring of her gestation.

Chelsea answer on 10 May '11 at 11:28

I would recommend taking a home pregnancy test about 2-3 weeks after your missed period. If you want to take one earlier (a few days after your missed period) then I'd recommend you buy one specifically made for testing early (like the Early Response ones). As far as activities.. 1) Stay away from most amusement park and fair rides (especially ones with heavy movement/jerking such as roller coasters, rides that spin and go upside down, etc). 2) Bicycling can be harmful during the first trimester, especially if you're biking long distances (due to the shift of gravity). 3) Horseback riding (due to the extremely bumpy movement, at times, and the risk of falling). 4) Gymnastics (due to the risk of falling and trauma to your uterus and stomach). 5) Most contact sports (like soccer, basketball, football, etc) due to the risk of injury to your stomach area. 6) Avoid hot tubs/saunas due to the high heat index and birth defect risks. 7) Scuba diving (because of the change of oxygen, air bubbles can form in your blood stream causing severe birth defects, miscarriages, etc). Those are the main activities that are dangerous during pregnancy, but you should really avoid anything that can cause you to fall, injure yourself/trauma, or cause your body a change in oxygen.

Mother_of_2 answer on 10 May '11 at 15:49

That is alot of info. I posted a link to baby center. I used that alot when I was pregnant. The link lists all the test by trimesters. I am sure if you use this site it will help with all your questions for your project. Here is how that starts and I ONLY listed the first trimester: "First trimester tests" At your first prenatal visit, your practitioner will give you a thorough physical, including a pelvic exam. She'll do a Pap smear (unless you've had one recently) to check for abnormal cells, including cervical cancer. She may also do a culture to check for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Next, she'll order routine blood tests to identify your blood type and Rh status, and a blood count to check for anemia. She'll also have the lab test your blood for syphilis, hepatitis B, and immunity to German measles (rubella), and offer to test for HIV. (If your practitioner doesn't offer you an HIV test, be sure to ask about it. Being treated for HIV during pregnancy can dramatically reduce your chances of passing the infection to your baby.) In addition to taking blood, she'll ask for a urine sample to test for urinary tract infections and other conditions. If you're at high risk for gestational diabetes, a glucose challenge test might be done at your first visit. In some cases, your provider will also do a skin test to see if you've been exposed to tuberculosis. And if you're not sure whether you've even had chicken pox (or been vaccinated against the virus), she'll order a blood test to check for immunity. In addition, your caregiver may offer you genetic screening, such as a nuchal translucency screening (an ultrasound done at 10 to 12 weeks) or a first-trimester combined screening (an ultrasound and a blood test). These screening tests can give you some information about your baby's risk of having certain chromosomal problems and other birth defects. Another option is CVS, a prenatal genetic diagnostic test done between 10 and 13 weeks. Finally, depending on your ethnic background and medical history, you may have a blood test to see if your baby is at risk for sickle cell disease, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia, and certain other genetic disorders. " GOOD LUCK and I hope you get an A+

Mother_of_2 answer on 10 May '11 at 18:10

That is alot of info. I posted a link to baby center. I used that alot when I was pregnant. The link lists all the test by trimesters. I am sure if you use this site it will help with all your questions for your project. Here is how that starts and I ONLY listed the first trimester: "First trimester tests" At your first prenatal visit, your practitioner will give you a thorough physical, including a pelvic exam. She'll do a Pap smear (unless you've had one recently) to check for abnormal cells, including cervical cancer. She may also do a culture to check for chlamydia and gonorrhea. Next, she'll order routine blood tests to identify your blood type and Rh status, and a blood count to check for anemia. She'll also have the lab test your blood for syphilis, hepatitis B, and immunity to German measles (rubella), and offer to test for HIV. (If your practitioner doesn't offer you an HIV test, be sure to ask about it. Being treated for HIV during pregnancy can dramatically reduce your chances of passing the infection to your baby.) In addition to taking blood, she'll ask for a urine sample to test for urinary tract infections and other conditions. If you're at high risk for gestational diabetes, a glucose challenge test might be done at your first visit. In some cases, your provider will also do a skin test to see if you've been exposed to tuberculosis. And if you're not sure whether you've even had chicken pox (or been vaccinated against the virus), she'll order a blood test to check for immunity. In addition, your caregiver may offer you genetic screening, such as a nuchal translucency screening (an ultrasound done at 10 to 12 weeks) or a first-trimester combined screening (an ultrasound and a blood test). These screening tests can give you some information about your baby's risk of having certain chromosomal problems and other birth defects. Another option is CVS, a prenatal genetic diagnostic test done between 10 and 13 weeks. Finally, depending on your ethnic background and medical history, you may have a blood test to see if your baby is at risk for sickle cell disease, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia, and certain other genetic disorders. " GOOD LUCK and I hope you get an A+